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"Ask Jorge" Virginia Beach Real Estate Blog

Jorge Gonzalez, ABR, CRS, GRI

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New RE/MAX Video - Own It! Separating Wants From Needs

by Jorge Gonzalez, ABR, CRS, GRI

New RE/MAX Video - Own It! Small Cost, Big Impact (Seller Tips)

by Jorge Gonzalez, ABR, CRS, GRI

The ancient Chinese art of feng shui uses design principles to create harmonious spaces that encourage health, wealth and happiness. According to the practice, colors encourage energy to flow freely throughout a structure, and each color is thought of as an expression of one of the five feng shui elements: fire, earth, metal water and wood.

Here are a few things to keep in mind when designing your home using general feng shui color principles.

1. Wake up a space with yellow
Yellow energizes spaces and is great for brightening rooms and adding a welcoming feeling. Yellows can be an excellent choice for kitchens, living rooms, hallways and offices.

2. Hues that work for you
If it's a calm sanctuary for a restful night's sleep, feng shui rules suggest water-element colors of calming blues to create tranquility. If you'd like your bedroom to be more passionate than peaceful, fire element colors like red can help crank up the heat.

3. A blank canvas for the kitchen
In feng shui, white is one of the preferred shades for a kitchen because it encourages purity and freshness. Plus, it creates the perfect palette for the rich colors of food.

4. Better than a lullaby
Shades of green in a child's room help make calm, serene spaces for sleeping. Plus, wood-element shades of green also encourage growth and learning.

5. Mind your reds
While red is the Chinese color of luck and happiness, too much of the fiery color can throw things off balance, bringing aggression and over stimulation.

6. Shades for success
Wood-element colors like greens and browns promote creativity, and water elements like blues and blacks promote wealth. Combining shades of each can change the energy of your home workspace.

7. Look outside your walls
According to feng shui principles, adding accent pieces and furniture in elemental shades also can help change the energy of a space. You don't need to go big (or commit) with an entire wall.

Color can help bring balance to your home, but it works best when you're living in a place that suits your needs. Looking for harmony in a new zip code? Start by talking to an experienced agent, contact Jorge today at 757-287-3400.  

4 Things Your Agent Knows About Negotiating

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Negotiating your deal is one of the most critical aspects of your real estate journey. It's also one of the parts of the process where my experience can make the most dramatic difference. Your home purchase or sale, probably one of the biggest financial transactions you'll make in your life, is not the time to test rookie negotiation skills. Here are just a few things agents, as professional negotiators, know that help them reach the best closing agreement for you.

1. That knowledge is power
In addition to in-depth knowledge of the market and valuing a home, I will have dug into public records about the property and the neighborhood. I will also look into the seller's motivation. Knowing things like whether the seller is under pressure to move quickly can help shape negotiating strategy.

2. How to time it
Sometimes a quick response to an offer is critical. Other times, it's best to keep the other party on the hook. Knowing which strategy to employ is crucial in negotiations.

3. Objectivity is a must
As a professional negotiator, I am able to control the process without being affected by the emotions that swirl around real estate transactions for buyers and sellers. Among other potentially expensive missteps, inexperienced negotiators can reveal too much info to the other party, especially during intense, fast-moving negotiations.

4. What to ask for
If you don't ask for something, you won't get it. As your advocate, I will know how to ask for things like concessions and repairs in a manner that's most appealing to the other party.

Selling your bike online? Go forth and make a killer deal on that two-wheeler. But when it comes to buying or selling your home, stick with a professional. Real estate negotiation is no place for training wheels.

According to the National Association of Realtors, 42 percent of homebuyers start their home search online, and 92 percent use the Web during the home search process. While the Internet can be a good place to start looking, there are things real estate agents know about the process of buying and selling a home that can't be found in any Web browser. 

Here are a few. 

1. How to price a home

When setting a listing price, agents consider scores of factors, from local and national market trends and neighborhood development activity to the latest buyer preferences for kitchen appliances and landscaping. Every home is unique, and an agent with a track record of success knows how to price it attractively in the market.

The Internet isn't always much help when it comes to comparison shopping, either. Many of the same factors that help an agent set an appropriate listing price aren't available in an algorithm, so online estimators aren't always accurate – and could be costly if you purchase without consulting a real, live professional. 

2. Marketing offline

While online marketing can certainly be valuable, agents have networks of contacts and years of experience to round out their marketing plans. 

And, for buyers, agents often can tap into their network to learn about great properties before they hit the real estate websites or even the MLS.

3. Key points in the process

If you find a home you love online, the website won't be there to guide you through a mortgage application, find a home inspector or advise you what to do if an inspection reveals issues.

4. How to negotiate

Having an experienced, professional negotiator drive your transaction can be vital to reaching a fair price for the property you're buying or selling. A website can give you an estimate of how much a property should cost, but it can't evaluate whether that's a great price or not.

When you are ready to sell or buy a home, please contact me. I would be happy to help.  Jorge Gonzalez at 757-287-3400.

 

There’s no online calculator for setting the perfect listing price for your home. It takes experience, market savvy, and even a bit of psychology. A strong listing agent can help you set the right, most competitive price for your home. Here are a few things I would consider:

1. The competition
I look at the prices of similar homes in your area that either are currently listed or sold during the past few months. I’ll take into account how many days the properties were on the market, and how the listing prices for those homes differed from the final sale prices.

2. Market trends
What’s affecting the market in your neighborhood, and your region? I will consider national factors that shape the real estate market, such as possible rising interest rates, as well as local factors, like whether the average home price in your neighborhood has been rising or falling. I will also consider things such as new companies moving to the area in the near future, or plans for improving local amenities, like parks and shopping districts. All can increase the value of your home to a buyer.

3. Your neighbors
Although a home the same size and age recently sold for a high price, your own place might not fetch the exact same fortune if, say, junky cars continue to proliferate in your neighbor’s driveway. On the flip side, if the grass is in fact greener on the other side of the fence, your home’s value may be higher due to your neighbors’ curb appeal.

4. The Goldilocks price
Listing your home at a price that’s “just right” from the start is critical to selling it quickly, for the best price. Overpricing your home, and then dropping the price a few times while it sits on the market, could lead to a lower final sales price than if the home was priced appropriately from the beginning. And, of course, setting a price that’s too low leaves money on the table.

Wondering how much your home might be worth in today’s market? Contact me today, I would be happy to discuss it with you.  

Considering selling your home? You may be competing against your neighbors. Here are some things to look at before you list your home for sale:

1. Who's remodeled?

Tap into the neighborhood grapevine to find out who's remodeled their kitchen and upgraded their bathroom. I can look up the listing and sale price of those homes to find out if updates made a difference. 

2. How fast are homes selling?

Keep an eye on how quickly neighborhood homes have been moving off the market. A low inventory may mean you can set a higher listing price. I can add valuable pricing insight. 

3. Take inventory of the inventory

It's difficult to fetch a competitive price when you're competing for buyers. If several homes are for sale on your street, waiting a season may prevent your home from languishing on the market. Ask me about market trends in your area. 

4. Stay current on planning and zoning news

Keep tabs on upcoming public projects that could impact the timing of your sale. Is major road construction planned that may deter buyers? I can discuss selling strategies to work around issues.

5. Get the scoop on your neighborhood from an expert. I would be happy to assist you in selling your home.  

Did you receive a nice chunk of change with your tax return? Consider using it for home improvement projects that will increase your home's curb appeal. The following upgrades are all under $3,000. 

1. Replace door No. 1
As one of the first things a prospective buyer sees, your front door is critical to your home's curb appeal. Buy a new door and spruce it up with shiny new knobs, locks and knockers. An energy-efficient door can help you save money on bills and may make you eligible for federal tax credits next year.

2. Refresh the garage
That dented garage door panel you no longer notice? Prospective buyers will. Two new garage doors will set you back just under $3,000 and do wonders for spiffing up your home's exterior.

3. Get lit
Illuminating your walkway, installing motion-sensor lights or adding lighting fixtures that highlight your home's architectural features or landscaping help your property look as appealing at night as it does during the day. Added light also helps keep your property secure.

4. Add outdoor living space
Decks and patios are among the top features buyers look for. Use your refund to install a stamped-concrete patio or a small deck, and it's almost like adding another room to your home.

Books To Read To Your Kids About Moving

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Moving to a new home, a new neighborhood and a new school can be tough for kids. Luckily, a variety of children’s books are out there to help parents explain things, add some fun and hopefully alleviate fears.

Here are a few classics – and you can post your favorite children's book titles about moving in the comments section below:

1. “Alexander, Who's Not (Do You Hear Me? I Mean It!) Going to Move” by Judith Viorst
Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 1995
Poor Alexander. First, the kid had a Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. Now, his family is moving! Just like your kids, Alexander has to say goodbye to some special places and people, but with the help of his parents he learns to make the most of the situation.

2. “The Berenstain Bears’ Moving Day” by Stan and Jan Berenstain
Random House Books for Young Readers, 1981
Little Brother Bear’s pretty worried about moving, and more than a little scared. Kids can relate to his apprehension, and hopefully his positive change of view as moving day gets closer.

3. “A House for Hermit Crab” by Eric Carle
Aladdin Paperbacks, 1987
A little hermit crab has outgrown his shell and needs to find a bigger one – and new friends to help decorate it. This book will reassure kids that it will be easy to make new friends in their new town.

4. “Tigger’s Moving Day” by Kathleen W. Zoehfeld
Disney, 1999
Tigger needs a place with more bouncing room! His friends aren’t as close to his new house, but they still come and visit. A story to help kids understand they’ll still be able to hold on to old connections.

5. “Goodbye House” by Frank Asch
Moonbear Books, 1989
This book is a terrific way to talk about moving with preschoolers. After the moving van is packed, a little bear returns to say farewell to his old house, saying goodbye to everything, except, of course, the memories.

Other favorites include: “Big Dan’s Moving Van,” by Leslie McGuire, “Neville,” by Norton Juster, “The Moving House” by Mark Siegel, “I’m Not Moving, Mama” by Nancy White Carlstrom, and “The Leaving Morning,” by Angela Johnston.

New remax.com Video Demo Of Site Funcitionality.

by Jorge Gonzalez, ABR, CRS, GRI

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 99

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Virginia Beach VA 23452

757-287-3400
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Jorge Gonzalez primarily provides Real Estate and Property Management services for rental properties for the following areas of Hampton Roads:

Virginia Beach Real Estate For Sale and Virginia Beach Property Manager (Largest City In Hampton Roads)
Chesapeake Real Estate For Sale and Chesapeake Property Manager
Norfolk Real Estate For Sale
Suffolk Real Estate For Sale